Everything You Need To Know About The Haitian Hero – Black Napoleon


Toussaint L’Ouverture or Black Napoleon as he is fondly called is the famous military commander whose talent and skills threatened the European invaders.

He particularly spearheaded the Haitian revolution in the late 18th century. He was born in 1743 to an educated slave.

During the European conquest in Africa, they ruled the continent however but not without any form of challenge or counter attacks.

The Black Napolean was among the people who fought for black freedom and emancipation. He vehemently resisted the Saxons – a confederation of Germanic tribes on the North German Plain.

See Also: 10 Great African War Lords Who Resisted European and Arab Domination

Black Napoleon

” (Black) Slaves began revolting and killing their masters, in what would become the first truly successful slave rebellion in the world called the Haitian Revolution”– Erica Cummings

Gallantly he fought for freedom, employing every positive tactic to achieve it. By 1795, he had made significant successes in the Haitian fight for freedom. He started his career as a military commander in the French colony of Santo Domingo (capital of the Dominican Republic). He trained his contingent on the skills of Guerrilla warfare, which seemed to be an option that worked in their favor.

Black Napoleon 1

Toussaint L’Ouverture is a man of valor; he did a lot in his reign to fix the economy and security of the people. He was a staunch Roman Catholic who detested slavery and gave the fight for the Haitian freedom all of himself.

Black Napoleon is remembered for being a strategist, visionary, formidable intellectual and warrior with keen political acumen; he was a disciplinarian to the core.

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In his relations with his rivals, he was smartly discrete about his directions and intentions. Just like Mandela did in South Africa, Touissant preached reconciliation and believed that African-born blacks had to tolerate and learn from Europeans and mulattoes in the colony.

Black Napoleon’s faith in the eradication of racial tensions and slavery, as well as his firm foundation in the training of his Guerrilla troop helped the colony to resist attempts of French invasions even after his death in 1803. He was betrayed by his political comrades and handed over to the French government. He died in Prison.