This African Professor Is The Hero Of The Moment

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Early this week the social media contagiously shared and liked the act of kindness expressed by Ivorian Professor Honore Kahi.

Professor Honore Kahi willingly offered to carry his student’s baby during a lecture. The gesture beyond what words can express have melted and appealed to the hearts of many Africans.

The typical professors in African institutions are to be “revered” and would most probably not be caught in the act of carrying a student’s baby the way this Ivorian professor was pictured doing.

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Kahi appeared to have taken up the nursing challenge with a joyous heart. When we say schools develop people in character and in learning, I believe this is a clear cut practical to learn from.

It was just an act but the interpretation is quite gigantic. Report says that the kind-hearted man offered to help the mother with the baby so that she would gain back her concentration.

This stirred up laughter and admiration from the class. Like wildfire, the pictures were all over the internet. Many have praised Professor Honore Kahi on social media for being a “hero”, “good father” and “a role model”. He is enjoying love and commendations from all over the pace for being down to earth; for being a human being with a good heart.



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Professor Honore Kahi teaches communications at Ivory Coast’s Bouake University. He is of the view that women’s education should be encouraged. What a practical way of defending that notion!

In his interview with BBC, the professor believes Africans need to encourage each other.

“What prevails here is… male chauvinism”

“‘It is not because things are difficult that we do not dare. It is because we do not dare that they are difficult.’ In our environment we let ourselves be discouraged by others.”

On the efficiency of stopping the baby from crying by tying and holding him at his back like most African women do, he also said this:

“In fact, men are able to do certain things, and usually it’s the way society sees men that prevents them from doing these things.”

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