Strange! Britain Records First Ever White And Black Twins


Amelia and Jasmine, both one year old, are thought to be the first twins in the UK with different skin colors, despite coming from the same egg.- Metro News

37-year-old Libby Appleby, and 40-year-old Tafadzwa Madzimbamuto, a black engineer were told by doctors that their babies would be strikingly identical and the couple would be needing to mark them with the ink to be able to differentiate them. Surprisingly Amelia and Jasmine came into the world shocking both doctors and parents. They did not need the ink after all because they came out looking very different with rather ‘strikingly’ dissimilar features – different hair types; different eye colors and different skin colors; unlike the Hollywood super-child stars- Tia and Tamera who are identical in every sense of the word.

Amelia is white skinned and blue-eyed like the mother, while Jasmine is brown-skinned and brown-eyed like the father. The 1-year old twin sisters who have been mistaken for step-sisters are actually monozygotic (identical) twins, therefore, they share similar genetic features – finger prints, blood groups and obviously same-sex. The British twins who should have some semblances as identical twins usually are, defied the expectation as both look nothing alike in the outward appearance.

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Explaining this rare tendency, it is discovered that as much as they shared one egg, they grew in different sacs; and that’s why the differences were possible. Coupled with that fact that they have mixed-racial parents – so one of the twin took a white code and the other took the black code. In relation to this also, are other reported cases of fraternal twins with different skin and eye color.

According to Dr Claire Steves, from King’s College London’s department of twin research, “multiple genes control skin color and eye color, so while twins are likely to share these traits, it’s not definite”.

It is a fact in biology that some ‘identical-looking’ twins end up being genetically fraternal – dizygotic. In other words, they could actually come from different eggs and still look-alike. But this Amelia-Jasmine case is particularly rare; we could almost say they are ‘racially’ different but genetically identical.

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Though a rare tendency, it is still very much possible as similar examples have been seen in other countries. Above is a picture of 2 similar cases of white and black twin-sisters





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