Tajamuka Activist Allegedly Abducted, Tortured In Zimbabwe


One Tajamuka activist who is a known figure at the forefront of protests against Zimbabwe’s President Robert Mugabe has been admitted to a hospital after allegedly being beaten and tortured.

The Tajamuka campaign is the second campaign beside the This Flag campaign that is binding citizens together to protest against the government of Zimbabwe. Translated, the Tajamuka campaign’s name means ‘we are fed up’.

See Also: Stopping The Shocking Police Brutality In Zimbabwe – Tajamuka Campaign

Silvanos Mudzova is the Tajamuka activist in question. He claims to have been taken from his home in Harare on Tuesday night by unknown men.

Speaking with the BBC, he said that after he was taken, he had been blindfolded and tortured with sharp objects. He also claims to have been electrocuted on several parts of his body, including his genitals. His captors are said to have been armed.

Tajamuka Activist

Silvanos Mudzova had earlier spoken out against police brutality towards the Zimbabwean protesters, saying that he failed to understand it, in his words:

“All Zimbabweans are affected by the crisis and you find that most of the police officers are living below the poverty line in this country. So we are absolutely shocked by the way that they beat people who are actually calling for them to have a better life.”

See Also: Is President Mugabe Denying His Critics Food Aid? Zim’s Human Rights Commission Seems To Think So

The Tajamuka activist said that the attackers had interrogated him, wanting to know who was funding his Tajamuka pressure group and why they were campaigning against President Mugabe’s government. Tajamuka’s campaign spokesman was arrested earlier this week but was granted bail on Wednesday.

Tajamuka Activist

With this news, president Mugabe’s warning that there would be no Zimbabwean uprising similar to the “Arab Spring” seems to take on a life of its own and become eerily terrifying. Will the protesters be able to continue in their, so far, unrelenting demand for a change in government?