Meet The Man Who Was Forced Into A Coffin For Being A Black South African

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Victor Rethabile Mlotshwa was the man who was humiliated and forced into a coffin by 2 white South Africans.

After seeing the viral online video of his humiliation, the farm worker went straight to the police and filed a case against the racist culprits.

According to Victor Rethabile Mlotshwa, he worked at the JM de Beer Boerdery, near the Komati power station in Mpumalanga. He described the farm owner as a good man. The employer had traveled to Namibia when the incident happened in August.

See Also: The White Men Who Forced Black South African Into Coffin Have Been Arrested

The video, which lasted for about 20 seconds, showed the victim being brutally forced into a coffin. As Victor resisted and squealed, the white oppressors identified as Willem Oosthuizen and Theo Martins Jackson threatened to pour petrol over him and set him on fire. They also threatened to put a snake into the coffin as well.

Racist Coffin Video

Victor Rethabile Mlotshwa said he was helpless and could not do anything to defend himself because he was tied and one of the men was armed with a gun.

“They beat me up, tied me and put me in a coffin.”

“They accused me of trespassing on their farm and they started beating me up. There was a footpath there and I decided to use it.



“The next thing, there was a grave and then a coffin. There was nothing I could do because the other man had a gun.”

A witness and co-worker who prefers to remain anonymous says the attackers were the employer’s subordinates.

“His subordinate took over when the boss was away. He took Victor and accused him of stealing a cable.”

See Also: Malema Threatens To Lock Up FW de Klerk For Killing Black People

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Willem Oosthuizen and Theo Martins Jackson, who appeared at the Middleburg Magistrate Court on Wednesday alongside Victor will remain behind bars until January 25, the new date for their court case. They were denied bail.

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Aggrieved black South Africans and political figures appeared at the court premises to show solidarity to the dehumanized black brother.

Julius Malema had since condemned the act of the white men in the strongest manner, calling it racist.

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