Mugabe’s Birthday Party To Hold In Matopo National Park



Although President Mugabe is currently out of the country, his loyal supporters have taken it upon themselves to plan Mugabe’s birthday.

Mugabe’s birthday party to commemorate his new age – 93 years – will be reportedly held at the national park where British imperial leader, Cecil John Rhodes, is buried.

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The event is being planned by the 21st February Movement, who always decide the venue for President Mugabe’s birthday celebrations. The venue for the celebration changes each year, rotating the 10 provinces.

Some previous venues include the Rudhaka Stadium in Marondera,  Chipadze Stadium in Bindura in Mashonaland Central Province, Chinhoyi- Mashonaland West Province. Last year the event was held at the Great Zimbabwe Monument in Masvingo, a Unesco World Heritage site.

The 21st February movement is an arm of the ZANU-PF Youth league to both celebrate the Zimbabwean leader’s birthday as well as “emulate Robert Mugabe’s revolutionary ideas, charismatic leadership and selfless policies”. The name of this arm of the youth league is adapted from the President’s birthday, however, the celebrations hardly ever hold on the exact date.

Mugabe's Birthday Party To Hold In Matopo National Park

The current venue is the Matopo National Park which is about half an hour’s drive from the second city of Bulawayo in the south of the country, according to the Zimbabwe Broadcasting Corporation (ZBC).

ZBC said:

“Matabeleland South province will this year host the 21st February Movement, with the Matopo National Park named as the venue for this year’s celebrations.”

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Last year, Mugabe’s supporters threatened to dig up Rhode’s remains following the #RhodesMustFall campaign in South Africa.

Mugabe’s lavish birthday parties which usually cost thousands of dollars and sometimes millions have been largely criticised of being insensitive to current economic situations in the southern African country.