10 Delicious Soups From Around Africa And Where They Are Best Made


Soups are a big part of the African cuisine, in fact, it’s safe to say that African soups are the main attraction of cuisine in the continent.

African soups can be made with a combination of vegetables and ingredients that are native to the countries where they are most eaten.

Very many African soups are usually eaten with other food staples such as rice, fufu, banku, sadza, garri, pounded yam, and so on.

Below are some of our favorite soups from different African countries.

1. Okra soup

okra soup african soups
Source: foodacemeals.blogspot.com

Okra soup is a popular west African dish with okra as its main ingredient. Although this deliciously slimy dish can be cooked with the local palm oil, it is also a good choice for people who are wary of adding oil to their soups.

2. Abenkwan

abenkwan palmnut soup - african soups
Source: Pinterest

Abenkwan is a Ghanaian soup made from the nuts of the palm tree. The pulp is extracted from the palm fruits and cooked in combination with spices and preferred meat of choice.

Abenkwan has an earthy flavor thanks to the addition of the palm fruit pulp (which is different from the palm oil). Serve warm with rice balls or Kokonte and you will be satisfied to the moons and back.

3. Muriwo na Nyama

leafy beefy stew zim soups

Muriwo na nyama is also known as leafy-beefy or high fields stew. It is native to Zimbabwe, highly nutritious and cn be eaten with sadza.

See Also: 10 Zimbabwean Dishes To Try Before Death Knocks On Your Door

4. Pepper soup

meat pepper soup african soup
Source: sisijemimah.com

Pepper soup is a spicy African soup that will make your taste buds tingle with excitement. The soup is gotten from the stock of the meat or fish used. It is also spiced with local ingredients, giving it a tantalizing aroma and taste that will make you hungry even if you just had dinner.

For the best experience, have your pepper soup hot–not scalding hot of course– and thank us later.

5. Agushie/Egusi soup

egusi soup african soup
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Agushie (Ghana)/Egusi(Nigeria) is a delicious soup cooked with shelled melon seeds. The method of preparation might differ across the different regions in which this soup is eaten but it ultimately includes the addition of leafy greens, seasoning and palm oil. In Nigeria, its best served with freshly pounded yam.

See Also: Gambian Food: 10 Delicacies You’ll Absolutely Love From The West African Country

6. Domoda

domod peanut soup african soup
Source: akinyiochieng.com

Domoda is the Gambia’s national dish, second only to Yassa. It is a yummy soup cooked with unsweetened peanut butter. It might also contain sweet potatoes. Domoda is better enjoyed with rice.

7. Afang

afang soup african soups
Source: sisijemimah.com

Afang is a delightful and satisfying soup from southern Nigeria. It is similar to the eru soup in Cameroon. They both make use of the afang/okazi leaves. However, the afang leaves are pounded and used in addition to water leaf. Afang soup is rich in deliciousness and best served hot with fufu and lots of meat.

8. Ndole

ndole african soups cameroon
Source: afrofoodtv.com

Ndole is another leafy vegetable soup with its home in Cameroon. It is often considered the national dish of the central African country. It’s a creamy and nutritious soup cooked with pureed peanuts and bitter leaf.

9. Afia efere/ Ofe nsala

white soup afia efere nsala
Source: madivas.com

In the Nigerian local languages of Annang and Igbo, afia efere and ofe nsala respectively mean ‘white soup’ in English. Technically, this mouth-watering spicy soup should be called ‘brown soup’ but where’s the fun in that? It is apparently called ‘white’ for the lack of palm oil use.

See Also: Interesting Facts About The Yoruba People Of Nigeria

10. Ewedu Soup

amala and ewedu soup african soups
source: pinterest

Ewedu is a Nigerian soup which is popular among the Yorubas. It’s a leafy vegetable soup but unlike other African soups, the greens (jute leaves) are pureed and cooked with nothing more than salt, locust beans and often potash.

It is usually served in addition to peppered stews (as pictured above) or gbegiri (beans soup). Yorubas love to eat this with amala, a starchy swallow made from yam peels and sometimes plantains.

Featured Image: Chef Fregz

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