Ghana Decides: Nana Akufo-Addo Wins Presidential Election


Ghana decided to elect as her new leader, the main opposition leader, Nana Akufo-Addo, who has sought the job in three different presidential polls. He ran a campaign dominated by promises to find solutions to the country’s faltering economy.

There was a lot of celebration as crowds of supporters gathered outside the house of the 72-year-old New Patriotic Party (NPP) leader. Nana Akufo-Addo had already claimed victory on Thursday prior to the announcement by the country’s electoral commissioner, Charlotte Osei.

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Charlotte Osei told a news conference in the capital, Accra, on Friday;

“It is my duty and my privilege to declare Nana Akufo-Addo as the president elect of Ghana.”

The new President-elect had defeated sitting president Mahama by 53.8 percent to 44.4 percent. He tweeted shortly before the announcement that President Mahama had called him to congratulate him on winning the 2016 presidential election.

Nana Akufo-Addo

Talking to his crowd of jubilant supporters in front of his home, he said;

“I make this solemn pledge to you tonight: I will not let you down. I will do all in my power to live up to your hopes and expectations.”

President-elect, Nana Akufo-Addo during his campaign promised free high-school education and more factories. His critics have questioned the possibility of achieving those ambitions.

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The new President spoke to Al Jazeera and explained what he believed to be the hopes and expectations of Ghanaians:

“The expectations they have of me, that I’m gonna bring them a new government, a new style; a government of honesty, a government that is concerned about the welfare of our people – that basic commitment is the one I am determined to fulfill.”

Before the announcement, President Mahama appealed to his own supporters to maintain calm and promised to respect the outcome of the vote whether he won or lost.

Ghana has been a multi-party democracy since the end of military rule in 1992. The results and subsequent concessions are just another feather in the cap of a nation that has become known for the peaceful transfer of power between administrations.

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